While in Cape Town, we were surprised (and a bit overwhelmed) by the number of great tourist attractions. We were only here for 4 days and we wished it was 14 instead. We decided to do it “American style” and cram in as many things as we could with our limited time.

 

The first few things we did are described on our last post, HERE. The next thing we did was head down to Cape Point. There is a hop on-hop off bus that takes you there and to a number of other tourist spots, however we became aware of this too late and ended up getting a taxi driver through the guest house (Roodenburg House, highly recommend if you go and are ok with staying in the suburbs) to take us down there.

 

The nice thing about taking a taxi and using the same driver for a few days is that you get to know and talk to someone from the area, and sometimes it’s like having an unofficial tour guide. The other thing is that you always have someone to take your pictures at cheesy landmarks like this:

 
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At the cape of good hope, a landmark discovered by a Portuguese explorer and previously used as a navigational point for European ships traveling East, there are cliffs that you can climb up that give you a stunning view of the coast.

 
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The birds like this spot too

 
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A bit of a drive through the park from the Cape of Good Hope is Cape Point Lighthouse. Although it doesn’t look like anything special, from the top the view of the cost is spectacular. The most notable thing about this view though, is that you are literally looking at the point where two of the world’s most powerful bodies of water–the Atlantic and Indian oceans–meet. Supposedly there is something special and extremely powerful about points where oceans come together. I’m not sure of the history or science on this, but I do know that standing there, right at the tip of the African continent, with only great oceans in front of us, even the wind seemed to shout: “How small you are, how small you are, but how grand it is that you are here!” Very cool ;)

 
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Costal views from Cape Point

 
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Costal view, just left of the point where the Atlantic and Indian oceans meet

 
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Also on this trip we stopped at Boulders Beach to see, what else? African Penguins!! These penguins are an endangered species and the ONLY place in the world that they live is the Southern coast of South Africa. These particular penguins formed a colony here in Simonstown, and although one side of the beach they occupy is protected from human interference, the other side is not. On the unprotected side, humans and penguins alike can swim around in the water together!

 

Unfortunately, although we were prepared to swim with the penguins, there were too many people on that side the day we went and the penguins had shyed away. We managed to amuse ourselves by simply taking photos and videos of the adorable creatures on the protected side.

 
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I think I was looking forward to seeing the penguins more than anything else on our South African trip so far. I felt like a little kid, I was so excited!

 
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Seriously, are these not the cutest little animals ever??

 
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Too cute!!

 
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These penguins were fighting…over their nest I think.

 
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Hey guys, wait for me!!

 
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You just want to pick him up and squeeze him, right?

 
When our excursion was over we were tired but very happy. Certainly a day not to be forgotten!

 
P.S. For more facts on African Penguins, some cute kids books on African animals, or to sponsor a penguins nest, see this web site: http://www.africanpenguine.co.za